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Peter J. O'Neil, FASAE, CAE

Chief Executive Officer​

News Release

ASIS International School Safety and Security Council Addresses Active Shooter

 

Alexandria, Va. 2016-04-14

​The ASIS International School Safety and Security Council has released a highly-anticipated white paper, Active Shooter. The 60-page paper consists of 13 chapters written by members of the council who hold security and safety positions at colleges, universities, and K-12 schools, or are consultants to these institutions.

Each author addresses a different proactive approach to preventing and responding to active shooter situations. After an introduction to active shooter programs, the following topics are among those covered in subsequent chapters:

  • The six phases of an attack
  • Pre-attack indicators
  • On-site training programs
  • Behavioral threat assessment teams
  • Hardening the target
  • K-12 as soft targets
  • Lessons learned

The last chapter, “To Arm or Not to Arm…Teachers,” examines both sides of this heated debate and offers advice on teacher training and the consequences of each strategy. The author concludes, however, “that both sides have the same goal, which is to keep our schools, students, and teachers safe.”
 
Active Shooter ends with five appendices, which include articles from the award-winning ASIS publication, Security Management, “A Guide to Safe Schools” from the U.S. Department of Education and conclusions from the ASIS Workplace Violence Prevention and Response Guidelines.
 
The goal of the Active Shooter white paper, as well as this highly-active council is clear: the safety of children. “Ultimately, we must think proactively and take action to protect individuals if the unthinkable happens,” writes Lawrence Fennelly, member and past chair of the School Safety and Security Council. “Take some action. Get prepared. Above all, train everyone—employees, security personnel, students, faculty, and staff.”
  
As Jennifer Hesterman, EdD, author of Chapter 10 points out, “What is the cost of not securing your school?”

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ASIS International (ASIS) is the largest membership organization for security management professionals that crosses industry sectors, embracing every discipline along the security spectrum from operational to cybersecurity. Founded in 1955, ASIS is dedicated to increasing the effectiveness of security professionals at all levels.

Through hundreds of chapters across the globe, ASIS develops and delivers board certifications and industry standards, hosts networking opportunities, publishes the award-winning Security Management magazine, and offers educational programs, including the Annual Seminar and Exhibits—the security industry’s most influential event. Whether providing thought leadership through the CSO Roundtable for the industry’s most senior executives or advocating before business, government, or the media, ASIS is focused on advancing the profession, and ensuring that the security community has access to intelligence, resources, and technology needed within the business enterprise. www.asisonline.org