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Business Continuity Management Guideline

Organizations of all sizes and types are susceptible to events that can disrupt operations—floods, tornados, terrorist attacks, public health emergencies, and more. To weather such crises, organizations need a business continuity management (BCM) program so they can recover as quickly as possible. This Guideline specifies steps that an organization can take to effectively manage a disruptive event with the potential to impact an organization’s ability to survive. It also outlines actions to help ensure continued viability.

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About the Guideline

pubcover-2447-sa.jpg Organizations of all sizes and types are susceptible to events that can disrupt operations—floods, tornados, terrorist attacks, public health emergencies, and more. To weather such crises, organizations need a business continuity management (BCM) program so they can recover as quickly as possible.

Management must identify risks and create policies to address disruptive incidents that can threaten an organization’s ability to recover and survive. The process begins with a risk assessment and business impact analysis, keeping in mind the objectives of the organization. Personnel across the business may be called upon to help with the planning, including those involved in human resources, legal, facilities, IT, security, and finance.

The BCM plan should consider impacts on people, facilities, legal obligations, finances, reputation, the community, and the environment. It should determine the maximum allowable time to recover from an incident and provide avenues of communication to employees, stakeholders, and the media.

Once a plan is in place, management should monitor the many facets, reviewing and testing it regularly and making improvements as needed.

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